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Advocacy Section

Webinar: Disclosure post Jackson - what do you need to know? (2 July 2014)

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In one of the four webinars inclusive in 2014 Advocacy Section membership, Mark Surguy examines how parties to litigation are making use of the more flexible approach to disclosure following the Jackson reforms

Mark Surguy

Speaker: Mark Surguy

On 1 April 2013 most of the Jackson reforms to costs in civil litigation came into force. Disclosure is a major source of expense for parties, with e-disclosure in particular increasing the burden and costs. As a result, the Jackson reforms have done away with standard disclosure as the default option, and a new menu of disclosure options is available. The upshot is far greater scope for the court and practitioners to design a tailor-made approach, and for parties and their advisors to give more thought to the disclosure process – all with a view to inter-party cooperation and the more efficient control of costs.

This webinar will examine how parties to litigation are making use of the more flexible approach to disclosure following the Jackson reforms as well as a discussion of the following.

  • The need for forward planning and coordination
  • Disclosure budgets – getting it right
  • What is proportionate in the context of disclosure?
  • eDisclosure protocol for the Technology and Construction Court
  • Cloud computing - what can you access for litigation
  • BYOD – how do you separate the private from the corporate?
  • Third party disclosure
  • Recent cases

 The audio webinar took place at 13:00 on 2 July 2014. You can now view a recorded version.

Speaker

Mark Surguy, partner, Eversheds.

Mark is a partner in the Fraud Group at Eversheds. He specialises in multi-disciplinary, complex and commercially sensitive cases where urgent legal remedies are required and where large volumes of electronic information have to be collected, searched and produced in court.

Mark was formerly head of fraud at a large international law firm, and has 25 years’ experience in commercial litigation and fraud. He is co-author of the chapter, ’Electronic Disclosure in UK Litigation and Investigations’ in the 2009 American Bar Association’s publication, Electronic Evidence and Discovery: What Every Lawyer Should Know Now, and assisted with the writing of the section on ’The Management of Technology Related Risks’ in Sweet & Maxwell’s Encyclopaedia of IT Law. Mark also writes the e-disclosure practice notes for Lexis PSL.

Mark wrote about how parties are taking advantage of the more flexible approach to disclosure following the Jackson reforms, in May’s Advocacy Section newsletter. Read it here.

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